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Co-ordination of current projects: Mark Sommer (5 hits)

Current research studies (work in progress)
Supported by: Anniversary Fund of the Oesterreichische Nationalbank
Study by: Austrian Institute of Economic Research
Climate change is one of today's grand challenges. The EU has committed itself to ambitious emission reduction targets: for 2020 and 2030, the EU aims at reducing its greenhouse gas emissions compared to 1990 by 20 percent and 40 percent, respectively, for 2050 an emission reduction by at least 80 percent is strived for. For large emitters in industry and energy generation the EU has established the European Emission Trading System (EU ETS) in 2005 defining an EU-wide reduction target. Emissions from other sources, most notably from the household and transport sectors, are instead regulated at EU member countries level and should be reduced by 30 percent by 2030, with differentiated reduction targets for the individual EU member countries. To achieve the emission reduction targets in the Non-ETS sectors the issue of carbon pricing has recently gained in momentum in the political discussion at EU as well as at EU member countries level. The project SoMBI focuses on two research questions: What are the effects of an EU-wide carbon price for the Non-ETS sectors that allows achieving the 30 percent reduction target in different EU member countries? What are the effects of different revenue recycling options in the EU member countries? To answer these questions, we perform a model-based analysis with the new ADAGIO-DYNK model. The CO2 price necessary to achieve the 30 percent EU-wide reduction target for the Non-ETS sectors is estimated. Also, detailed results for two case study countries are discussed. The countries (Austria and Poland) differ considerably in terms of the structure of their energy systems and economies. First, we focus on the macroeconomic, emission and distributional impacts of the tax. Then, the effects of different revenue recycling options are assessed and policy recommendations for the introduction of a carbon tax are developed.
Current research studies (work in progress)
Study by: Austrian Institute of Economic Research
Commissioned by: Klima- und Energiefonds
START2030 aims at providing comprehensive analyses of the economic incidence and social impacts of a transition to a 100 percent renewable electricity system by 2030. Policy scenarios will be analysed to depict the broad range of effects of this transformation. The analysis will deliver insights on the emission impact as well as on the macroeconomic and distributional effects of the transformation. Policy recommendations on how to mitigate detrimental effects on vulnerable groups will be derived.
Current research studies (work in progress)
Study by: Austrian Institute of Economic Research – Joanneum Research Forschungsgesellschaft mbH – University of Graz, Wegener Center for Climate and Global Change – University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna
Commissioned by: Klima- und Energiefonds
To solve the climate crisis, a fundamental decarbonisation of the economy is indispensable. In addition to technological changes, this requires accompanying climate policy measures, most importantly the taxation of carbon emissions. As this instrument leads to manifold indirect effects and uncertainties, FARECarbon employs a stakeholder-assisted multi model comparison of carbon taxation in Austria. It aims to reduce model uncertainties and to synthesise the debate on carbon taxes, and to develop a concerted proposal on how to implement carbon taxes in Austria.
Project lead: Mark Sommer
Project team member: Ina Meyer
The Role of Secondary Resources in the Austrian Energy Transition (ROSE-Trans) (Die Rolle sekundärer Rohstoffe in der österreichischen Energiewende)
Current research studies (work in progress)
Supported by: Anniversary Fund of the Oesterreichische Nationalbank
Study by: Austrian Institute of Economic Research – University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna
The recycling of photovoltaic panels, wind power plants, and electric vehicles will gain importance in the future. The implementation of these product groups has been dynamic and they are likely to enter markets even more drastically if national pledges to achieve the climate change targets in the Paris Agreement are taken seriously. This has been highlighted in many energy scenarios developed for EU countries, including Austria. However, not much attention has been set on the recyclability potential of these product groups and their macroeconomic implications. So far, it remains unknown if the increase in product stocks for renewable energy production and consumption is consistent with the concept of a sustainable circular economy. Our research therefore aims to derive state-of-the-art information on current and foreseeable recycling potentials for these three product groups in Austria and to develop reasonable recycling scenarios in terms of circular economy strategies, which are in turn part of currently available renewable energy scenarios. In addition, a macroeconomic model analysis is used to estimate the effects on employment and value added as well as on selected energy and environmental indicators.
Current research studies (work in progress)
Commissioned by: Klima- und Energiefonds
Study by: Austrian Institute of Economic Research – International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis – University of Graz, Wegener Center for Climate and Global Change
EconTrans offers an integrated perspective to address interlinked challenges: rapid greenhouse gas emission reduction, achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, and coping with fundamental transformations triggered by breakthrough technologies, from plus-energy buildings to self-driving electric cars. Enlarging the scope of conventional analysis by rethinking the indicators of well-being, extending the scope of resources and deepening the understanding of how well-being relates to planetary boundaries allow to derive recommendations for targeted policies.